Wild West History Association Dedicated to the history and lore of the American West
Wild West History Association Dedicated to the history and lore of the American West
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John Chivington

 

(January 21, 1821 - October 4, 1894)

 

Born in Lebanon, Ohio and initially a Methodist preacher, John Chivington gained renown during the Civil War showing courage and skill during the battles in New Mexico at Apache Pass, Glorieta Pass and Pigeon's Ranch.

 

His skill during those engagements resulted in his being breveted as Colonel of the 1st Colorado Volunteers. It is believed he had political ambitions and wanted to run for Congress.

 

Possibly because of those political ambitions, John Chivington led a group of militia into a peaceful indian village (designated by a white and American Flag over the main lodge), slaughtered and mutilated hundreds of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians. Most of the dead were women and children. This event became known as the Sand Creek Massacre.

 

There are two sides to the Sand Creek Massacre, one side believes that the village was peaceful with mostly women and children and the other side believes the village was a recluse for hostile indian Dog Soldiers.

 

John Chivington is buried in the Fairmont Cemetery in Denver, Colorado.

 

 

Information compiled by Steve Grimm

Books About the Sand Creek Massacre

 

Month of the Freezing Moon by Duane Schultz

 

This book projects my view that the village was peaceful and Chivington was just trying to make a name for himself.

 

The Battle of Sand Creek by Morse H. Coffin

 

This book reprints the scrapbook of a Militia person who was at the battle. Gives a different perspective about the fear of indian attack on the eastern Colorado plains. This book was privately published and limited to 300 copies, thus it may be hard to find.

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© Wild West History Association - a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation

http://www.WildWestHistory.org